Judges in Louisiana and most other states prefer that both parents take an active role in raising their children. Therefore, there is a good chance that you will be allowed to stay in touch with a son or daughter whether you are granted custody rights or not. Ideally, a visitation schedule will preserve the child’s best interests while also working for you and the child’s other parent.

Alternating weekends is a popular option

In first few weeks or months after a separation or divorce, noncustodial parents may be given the ability to see their children on alternating weekends. If you are a noncustodial parent, you would typically have access to your son or daughter starting early on Friday evening until Sunday afternoon. However, you and the custodial parent will likely have the ability to negotiate a visitation window that works best for everyone.

Weekday or weeknight visits are a possibility

As a noncustodial parent, you may be granted visitation rights to your child during the week. For instance, a weekend visit may be extended until Monday if the child has that day off from school. You may also be allowed to stop by the custodial parent’s house once or twice a week for a family dinner or other family activity. If you and your child’s custodial parent live in close proximity to each other, overnight visits may be allowed during the week.

 

Visitation schedules should be as flexible as possible

It is rare for a person to work the same hours each day or have the same schedule each week. Therefore, both parents may need to accept that a rigid visitation or custody schedule may not necessarily be in a child’s best interest. Instead, you and your child’s other parent should work together to meet any challenges that your busy schedules create.

If you need help creating or enforcing a visitation schedule, feel free to speak with a family law attorney. He or she may be able to help an individual work out a reasonable solution in a timely manner.

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